By end of Fall semester the students will go over words by language.

The six languages chosen are the following:
Latin
Greek
French
German
Dutch
Old English

Our classes started on Sep 12 and finish on Dec 7.

We expect the following output from kids

1. Kids should start to learn to type using bbc typepad – http://www.bbc.co.uk/guides/z3c6tfr and complete level 4

2. Story – We request 2-3 stories or articles by each kid to be send via email typed so we can monitor vocabulary and usage . We will not accept any hand written notes (Parents can help type if kids cannot). You can send these to us at end of Sep, Oct and Nov.

3. Monthly contest – We will hold a monthly friendly contest to check K-2 and 3-6 grades and evaluate the standing.

4. Google define and Dictionary – We expect kids to become familiar with dictionary and concepts while using ‘define’ keyword in google (example define ‘vocabulary’ – https://www.google.com/search?q=define+%27vocabulary%) . We expect kids to be digital natives while appreciating the difference between actual dictionary usage vs. Google Define limitations.

UIL ,NSF and National Scripps will all be in Spring semester and we want kids to bee ready during winter break.

For each week a list of fifteen words for a language will be provided. There is a total of thirty words per language, so a single language will cover two of the twelve weeks. The order of presenting the languages is at the discretion of the teacher. The teacher can review some or all of the fifteen words for a week.

In between going over the words, various activities can be will be used to focus on spelling:
Scrabble
Word jumble

Spelling bee (competitors can be in groups or can participate alone)

Etymology – Knowing the origins of a word can lead to how to spell it. This is dependent on the student having some background on roots and how different sounds are made in English words that come from a language. For instance, if a word comes from Greek and there is an “f” sound in the word, there’s a good chance that this “f” sound is spelled by “ph.”

Syllables – One technique for spelling is to divide the word into syllables and spell each of these syllables.
Definitions – The definition of a word, along with the etymology, can trigger memories of roots and appropriate ways to spell from the source language the different sounds made by the word.
Here is an example: The word is “fidelity.” You are given that the word comes from Latin. You are also given this definition: “Faithfulness to a person, cause, or belief, demonstrated by continuing loyalty or support.”

If you know that the Latin word for “faith” is “fides,” then you can guess that the initial part of the word, “fide,” will be spelled similarly. Moreover, as you spell more words, you will start to notice that many words end with “ity.” Putting this information together, you can spell the entire word.

As in so many things, the key to learning how to spell is to practice and memorize. For memorization, repetition works for many words, but for especially tricky words, memory techniques can be useful. The technique of telling a story using the letters of the word is helpful.

Latin:

Alliteration
Ambivalent
Electoral
Animosity
Fastidious
Magnanimous
Subterfuge
Ostentatious
Susceptible
Exuberant
Soliloquy
Indigenous
Efficacy
Ameliorate
Perennial
Commensurate
Visceral
Infinitesimal
Corpuscle
Egregious
Refugee
Percolate
Bellicose
Discern
Affinity
Imperative
Triumvirate
Gradient
Fidelity
Incorruptible

Greek:

Android
Lethargy
Enthusiasm
Melancholy
Orthodox
Aristocracy
Homogenous
Automaton
Hierarchy
Etymology
Dichotomy
Diphthong
Zephyr
Anachronism
Hippopotamus
Pneumatic
Cynosure
Arachnid
Paradigm
Cacophony
Apostrophe
Eureka
Democracy
Analysis
Synergy
Agnostic
Topical
Acronym
Spherical
Myriad

French:

Mystique
Dressage
Rehearse
Matinee
Entourage
Escargot
Doctrinaire
Egalitarian
Deluxe
Clementine
Fusillade
Surveillance
Rapport
Saboteur
Rendezvous
Repertoire
Renaissance
Lieutenant
Debacle
Camouflage
Ambulance
Plateau
Physique
Amenable
Nougat
Beige
Vogue
Garage
Flamboyant
Impasse
German:

Angst
Hinterland
Verboten
Wanderlust
Waltz
Bratwurst
Poltergeist
Knapsack
Realschule
Pitchblende
Schadenfreude
Glockenspiel
Weimaraner
Ersatz
Gesundheit
Zeitgeber
Dreidel
Rottweiler
Springerle
Pfeffernuss
Noodle
Nachtmusik
Glitz
Zwinger
Bagel
Rucksack
Prattle
Pumpernickel
Panzer
Seltzer

Dutch:

Cockatoo
Furlough
Buckwheat
Grabble
Ravel
Netherlander
Muddle
Loiter
Wiseacre
Howitzer
Voortrekker
Maelstrom
Mynheer
Galjoen
Waterzooi
Flense
Hartebeest
Roodebok
Wainscot
Apartheid
Clapboard
Daffodil
Waywiser
Buckwagon
Potash
Wintergreen
Huckster
Guilder
Trigger
Scrabble

Old English:
Quell
Nestle
Cleanser
Farthing
Mattock
Behoove
Hustings
Hassock
Earthenware
Nosiest
Newfangled
Folksiness
Yieldable
Paddock
Whirlpool
Dross
Threshold
Hawthorn
Fathom
Orchard
Bequeath
Worrisome
Nightingale
Mermaid
Dealership
Errand
Workmanship
Manhandle
Roughhewn
Kipper

1) Alliteration
Etymology:
ad- + Latin littera letter
Definition(s):
:the repetition of usually initial consonant sounds in two or more neighboring words or syllables (as wild and woolly, threatening throngs) called also head rhyme initial rhyme

2) Ambivalent
Etymology:
International Scientific Vocabulary
Definition(s):
:simultaneous and contradictory attitudes or feelings (as attraction and repulsion) toward an object, person, or action
:continual fluctuation (as between one thing and its opposite)
:uncertainty as to which approach to follow

3) Electoral
Etymology:

Definition(s):
:of or relating to an elector the electoral vote
:of or relating to election an electoral system
:a body of electors
:one that elects the president and vice president of the United States

4) Animosity
Etymology:
Middle English animosite, from Middle French or Late Latin; Middle French animosité, from Late Latin animositat-, animositas, from Latin animosus spirited, from animus
Definition(s):
:ill will or resentment tending toward active hostility :an antagonistic attitude

5) Fastidious
Etymology:
Middle English, from Latin fastidiosus, from fastidium disgust, probably from fastus arrogance (probably akin to Latin fastigium top) + taedium irksomeness tedium
Definition(s):
:scornful
:having high and often capricious standards :difficult to please critics … so fastidious that they can talk only to a small circle of initiates Granville Hicks
:showing or demanding excessive delicacy or care
:reflecting a meticulous, sensitive, or demanding attitude fastidious workmanship
:having complex nutritional requirements fastidious microorganisms

6) Magnanimous
Etymology:

Definition(s):

7) Subterfuge
Etymology:
Late Latin subterfugium, from Latin subterfugere to escape, evade, from subter- secretly (from subter underneath; akin to Latin sub under) + fugere to flee up, fugitive
Definition(s):
:deception by artifice or strategem in order to conceal, escape, or evade
:a deceptive device or stratagem

8) Ostentatious
Etymology:
(see ostentation)
Definition(s):
:marked by or fond of conspicuous or vainglorious and sometimes pretentious display

9) Susceptible
Etymology:
Late Latin susceptibilis, from Latin susceptus, past participle of suscipere to take up, admit, from sub-, sus- up + capere to take sub-, heave
Definition(s):
:capable of submitting to an action, process, or operation a theory susceptible to proof
:open, subject, or unresistant to some stimulus, influence, or agency susceptible to pneumonia
:impressionable responsive a susceptible mind

10) Exuberant
Etymology:
Middle English, from Middle French, from Latin exuberant-, exuberans, present participle of exuberare to be abundant, from ex- + uber fruitful, from uber udder udder
Definition(s):
:extreme or excessive in degree, size, or extent exuberant prosperity
:joyously unrestrained and enthusiastic exuberant praise an exuberant personality
:unrestrained or elaborate especially in style :flamboyant exuberant architecture
:produced in extreme abundance :plentiful exuberant foliage and vegetation

11) Soliloquy
Etymology:
Late Latin soliloquium, from Latin solus alone + loqui to speak
Definition(s):
:the act of talking to oneself
:a dramatic monologue that represents a series of unspoken reflections

12) Indigenous
Etymology:
Late Latin indigenus, from Latin indigena, noun, native, from Old Latin indu, endo in, within + Latin gignere to beget end-, kin
Definition(s):
:produced, growing, living, or occurring naturally in a particular region or environment indigenous plants the indigenous culture
:innate inborn

13) Efficacy
Etymology:
(see efficacious)
Definition(s):
:the power to produce an effect

14) Ameliorate
Etymology:
alteration of meliorate (see meliorate)
Definition(s):
:to make better or more tolerable
:to grow better

15) Perennial
Etymology:
Latin perennis, from per- throughout + annus year per-, annual
Definition(s):
:present at all seasons of the year
:persisting for several years usually with new herbaceous growth from a perennating part perennial asters
:persistent enduring perennial favorites
:continuing without interruption :constant perpetual the perennial quest for certainty a perennial student
:regularly repeated or renewed :recurrent death is a perennial literary theme

16) Commensurate
Etymology:
Late Latin commensuratus, from Latin com- + Late Latin mensuratus, past participle of mensurare to measure, from Latin mensura measure measure
Definition(s):
:equal in measure or extent :coextensive lived a life commensurate with the early years of the republic
:corresponding in size, extent, amount, or degree :proportionate was given a job commensurate with her abilities
:commensurable 1

17) Visceral
Etymology:

Definition(s):
:felt in or as if in the internal organs of the body :deep a visceral conviction
:not intellectual :instinctive unreasoning visceral drives
:dealing with crude or elemental emotions :earthy a visceral novel
:of, relating to, or located on or among the viscera :splanchnic visceral organs

18) Infinitesimal
Etymology:
New Latin infinitesimus infinite in rank, from Latin infinitus
Definition(s):
:an infinitesimal quantity or variable
:taking on values arbitrarily close to but greater than zero
:immeasurably or incalculably small an infinitesimal difference
:calculus 1b

19) Corpuscle
Etymology:
Latin corpusculum, diminutive of corpus Marcello Malpighi Filippo Pacini †1883 Italian anatomist
Definition(s):
:a minute particle
:a living cell
:one (as a red or white blood cell or a cell in cartilage or bone) not aggregated into continuous tissues
:any of various small circumscribed multicellular bodies
:the part of a nephron that consists of a glomerulus and Bowman’s capsule called also Malpighian body
:a pressure-sensitive mechanoreceptor that is an oval capsule terminating some sensory nerve fibers especially in the skin

20) Egregious
Etymology:
Latin egregius, from e- + greg-, grex herd gregarious
Definition(s):
:distinguished
:conspicuous
:conspicuously bad :flagrant egregious errors egregious padding of the evidence Christopher Hitchens

21) Refugee
Etymology:
French réfugié, past participle of (se) réfugier to take refuge, from Middle French refugier, from Latin refugium
Definition(s):
:one that flees
:a person who flees to a foreign country or power to escape danger or persecution

22) Percolate
Etymology:
Latin percolatus, past participle of percolare, from per- through + colare to sieve per-, colander
Definition(s):
:to cause (a solvent) to pass through a permeable substance (as a powdered drug) especially for extracting a soluble constituent
:to prepare (coffee) in a percolator
:to be diffused through :penetrate
:to ooze or trickle through a permeable substance :seep
:to become percolated
:to become lively or effervescent
:to spread gradually allow the sunlight to percolate into our rooms Norman Douglas
:simmer 2a the feud had been percolating for a long time

23) Bellicose
Etymology:
Middle English, from Latin bellicosus, from bellicus of war, from bellum war
Definition(s):
:favoring or inclined to start quarrels or wars

24) Discern
Etymology:
Middle English, from Middle French discerner, from Latin discernere to separate, distinguish between, from dis- apart + cernere to sift dis-, certain
Definition(s):
:to detect with the eyes discerned a figure approaching through the fog
:to detect with senses other than vision discerned a strange odor
:to recognize or identify as separate and distinct :discriminate discern right from wrong
:to come to know or recognize mentally unable to discern his motives
:to see or understand the difference

25) Affinity
Etymology:
Middle English affinite, from Anglo-French or Latin; Anglo-French affinité, from Latin affinitas, from affinis bordering on, related by marriage, from ad- + finis end, border
Definition(s):
:relationship by marriage
:sympathy marked by community of interest :kinship
:an attraction to or liking for something people with an affinity to darkness Mark Twain pork and fennel have a natural affinity for each other Abby Mandel
:an attractive force between substances or particles that causes them to enter into and remain in chemical combination
:a person especially of the opposite sex having a particular attraction for one
:likeness based on relationship or causal connection found an affinity between the teller of a tale and the craftsman Mary McCarthy this investigation, with affinities to a case history, a psychoanalysis, a detective story Oliver Sacks
:a relation between biological groups involving resemblance in structural plan and indicating a common origin
:a credit card which is issued in affiliation with a participating organization (as a charity or an airline) and the use of which earns a benefit for the organization or the cardholder
:chromatography in which a macromolecule (as a protein) is isolated and purified by passing it in solution through a column treated with a substance having a ligand for which the macromolecule has an affinity that causes it to be retained on the column
:a group of people having a common interest or goal or acting together for a specific purpose (as for a chartered tour)

26) Imperative
Etymology:
Middle English imperatyf, from Late Latin imperativus, from Latin imperatus, past participle of imperare to command emperor (see imperative)
Definition(s):
:of, relating to, or constituting the grammatical mood that expresses the will to influence the behavior of another
:expressive of a command, entreaty, or exhortation
:having power to restrain, control, and direct
:not to be avoided or evaded :necessary an imperative duty
:the grammatical mood that expresses the will to influence the behavior of another or a verb form or verbal phrase expressing it
:something that is imperative (see imperative): as
:command order
:rule guide
:an obligatory act or duty
:an obligatory judgment or proposition
:a moral obligation or command that is unconditionally and universally binding

27) Triumvirate
Etymology:

Definition(s):
:a body of triumvirs
:the office or government of triumvirs
:a group or association of three

28) Gradient
Etymology:
Latin gradient-, gradiens, present participle of gradi
Definition(s):
:the rate of regular or graded ascent or descent :inclination
:a part sloping upward or downward
:change in the value of a quantity (as temperature, pressure, or concentration) with change in a given variable and especially per unit distance in a specified direction
:the vector sum of the partial derivatives with respect to the three coordinate variables x, y, and z of a scalar quantity whose value varies from point to point
:a graded difference in physiological activity along an axis (as of the body or an embryonic field)
:change in response with distance from the stimulus

29) Fidelity
Etymology:
Middle English fidelite, from Middle French & Latin; Middle French fidelité, from Latin fidelitat-, fidelitas, from fidelis faithful, from fides faith, from fidere to trust bide
Definition(s):
:the quality or state of being faithful
:accuracy in details :exactness
:the degree to which an electronic device (as a record player, radio, or television) accurately reproduces its effect (as sound or picture)
:the reproduction of an effect (as sound or an image) that is very faithful to the original

30) Incorruptible
Etymology:

Definition(s):
:incapable of corruption: as
:not subject to decay or dissolution
:incapable of being bribed or morally corrupted

31) Android
Etymology:
Late Greek androeidēs manlike, from Greek andr- + -oeidēs -oid
Definition(s):
:a mobile robot usually with a human form

32) Lethargy
Etymology:
Middle English litargie, from Medieval Latin litargia, from Late Latin lethargia, from Greek lēthargia, from lēthargos forgetful, lethargic, irregular from lēthē
Definition(s):
:abnormal drowsiness
:the quality or state of being lazy, sluggish, or indifferent

33) Enthusiasm
Etymology:
Greek enthousiasmos, from enthousiazein to be inspired, irregular from entheos inspired, from en- + theos god
Definition(s):
:belief in special revelations of the Holy Spirit
:religious fanaticism
:strong excitement of feeling :ardor did her work with energy and enthusiasm
:something inspiring zeal or fervor his enthusiasms include sailing and fishing

34) Melancholy
Etymology:
Middle English malencolie, from Anglo-French, from Late Latin melancholia, from Greek, from melan- + cholē bile gall (see melancholy)
Definition(s):
:an abnormal state attributed to an excess of black bile and characterized by irascibility or depression
:black bile
:melancholia
:depression of spirits :dejection
:a pensive mood
:suggestive or expressive of sadness or depression of mind or spirit sang in a melancholy voice
:causing or tending to cause sadness or depression of mind or spirit :dismal a melancholy thought
:depressed in spirits :dejected sad
:pensive

35) Orthodox
Etymology:
Middle English orthodoxe, from Middle French or Late Latin; Middle French orthodoxe, from Late Latin orthodoxus, from Late Greek orthodoxos, from Greek orth- + doxa opinion doxology
Definition(s):
:conforming to established doctrine especially in religion
:conventional
:of, relating to, or constituting any of various conservative religious or political groups: as
:eastern orthodox
:of or relating to Orthodox Judaism
:one that is orthodox
:a member of an Eastern Orthodox church
:Judaism that adheres to the Torah and Talmud as interpreted in an authoritative rabbinic law code and applies their principles and regulations to modern living compare conservative judaism reform judaism
:of or consisting of the Eastern churches that form a loose federation according primacy of honor to the patriarch of Constantinople and adhering to the decisions of the first seven ecumenical councils and to the Byzantine rite
:eastern orthodox
:greek 2c

36) Aristocracy
Etymology:
Middle French & Late Latin; Middle French aristocratie, from Late Latin aristocratia, from Greek aristokratia, from aristos best + -kratia -cracy
Definition(s):
:government by the best individuals or by a small privileged class
:a government in which power is vested in a minority consisting of those believed to be best qualified
:a state with such a government
:a governing body or upper class usually made up of a hereditary nobility
:the aggregate of those believed to be superior

37) Homogenous
Etymology:

Definition(s):
:homoplastic 2
:homogeneous

38) Automaton
Etymology:
Latin, from Greek, neuter of automatos
Definition(s):
:a mechanism that is relatively self-operating
:robot
:a machine or control mechanism designed to follow automatically a predetermined sequence of operations or respond to encoded instructions
:an individual who acts in a mechanical fashion

39) Hierarchy
Etymology:
Middle English ierarchie rank or order of holy beings, from Anglo-French jerarchie, from Medieval Latin hierarchia, from Late Greek, from Greek hierarchēs
Definition(s):
:a division of angels
:a ruling body of clergy organized into orders or ranks each subordinate to the one above it
:the bishops of a province or nation
:church government by a hierarchy
:a body of persons in authority
:the classification of a group of people according to ability or to economic, social, or professional standing
:the group so classified
:a graded or ranked series a hierarchy of values
:a traditional hierarchy of angels ranked from lowest to highest into the following nine orders: angels, archangels, principalities, powers, virtues, dominions, thrones, cherubim, and seraphim

40) Etymology
Etymology:
Middle English ethimologie, from Anglo-French, from Latin etymologia, from Greek, from etymon + -logia -logy
Definition(s):
:the history of a linguistic form (as a word) shown by tracing its development since its earliest recorded occurrence in the language where it is found, by tracing its transmission from one language to another, by analyzing it into its component parts, by identifying its cognates in other languages, or by tracing it and its cognates to a common ancestral form in an ancestral language
:a branch of linguistics concerned with etymologies
:the transformation of words so as to give them an apparent relationship to other better-known or better-understood words (as in the change of Spanish cucaracha to English cockroach)

41) Dichotomy
Etymology:
Greek dichotomia, from dichotomos (see dichotomous)
Definition(s):
:a division into two especially mutually exclusive or contradictory groups or entities the dichotomy between theory and practice
:the process or practice of making such a division dichotomy of the population into two opposed classes
:the phase of the moon or an inferior planet in which half its disk appears illuminated
:bifurcation
:repeated bifurcation (as of a plant’s stem)
:a system of branching in which the main axis forks repeatedly into two branches
:branching of an ancestral line into two equal diverging branches
:something with seemingly contradictory qualities it’s a dichotomy, this opulent Ritz-style luxury in a place that fronts on a boat harbor Jean T. Barrett

42) Diphthong
Etymology:
Middle English diptonge, from Middle French diptongue, from Late Latin dipthongus, from Greek diphthongos, from di- + phthongos voice, sound
Definition(s):
:a gliding monosyllabic speech sound (as the vowel combination at the end of toy) that starts at or near the articulatory position for one vowel and moves to or toward the position of another
:digraph
:the ligature æ or œ
:a diphthong (as \ȯi\ in \ˈnȯiz\ noise) composed of a vowel followed by a less sonorous glide
:a diphthong in which the second element is more sonorous than the first (as \wi\ in \ˈkwit\ quit)

43) Zephyr
Etymology:
Middle English Zephirus, west wind (personified), from Latin Zephyrus, god of the west wind & zephyrus west wind, zephyr, from Greek Zephyros & zephyros
Definition(s):
:a breeze from the west
:any of various lightweight fabrics and articles of clothing

44) Anachronism
Etymology:
probably from Middle Greek anachronismos, from anachronizesthai to be an anachronism, from Late Greek anachronizein to be late, from Greek ana- + chronos time
Definition(s):
:an error in chronology
:a chronological misplacing of persons, events, objects, or customs in regard to each other
:a person or a thing that is chronologically out of place
:one from a former age that is incongruous in the present
:the state or condition of being chronologically out of place

45) Hippopotamus
Etymology:
Latin, from Greek hippopotamos, alteration of hippos potamios, literally, riverine horse
Definition(s):
:a very large herbivorous 4-toed chiefly aquatic artiodactyl mammal (Hippopotamus amphibius) of sub-Saharan Africa with an extremely large head and mouth, bare and very thick grayish skin, and short legs
:a smaller closely related mammal (Choeropsis liberiensis) of western Africa

46) Pneumatic
Etymology:
Latin pneumaticus, from Greek pneumatikos, from pneumat-, pneuma air, breath, spirit, from pnein to breathe sneeze
Definition(s):
:of, relating to, or using gas (as air or wind):
:moved or worked by air pressure
:adapted for holding or inflated with compressed air
:having air-filled cavities
:of or relating to the pneuma :spiritual
:having a well-proportioned feminine figure
:having a full bust

47) Cynosure
Etymology:
Middle French & Latin; Middle French, Ursa Minor, guide, from Latin cynosura Ursa Minor, from Greek kynosoura, from kynos oura, literally, dog’s tail
Definition(s):
:the northern constellation Ursa Minor
:north star
:one that serves to direct or guide
:a center of attraction or attention turned an eyesore into a cynosure Catherine Reynolds

48) Arachnid
Etymology:

Definition(s):
:any of a class (Arachnida) of arthropods comprising chiefly terrestrial invertebrates, including the spiders, scorpions, mites, and ticks, and having a segmented body divided into two regions of which the anterior bears four pairs of legs but no antennae

49) Paradigm
Etymology:
Late Latin paradigma, from Greek paradeigma, from paradeiknynai to show side by side, from para- + deiknynai to show diction
Definition(s):
:example pattern
:an outstandingly clear or typical example or archetype
:an example of a conjugation or declension showing a word in all its inflectional forms
:a philosophical and theoretical framework of a scientific school or discipline within which theories, laws, and generalizations and the experiments performed in support of them are formulated
:a philosophical or theoretical framework of any kind

50) Cacophony
Etymology:
(see cacophonous)
Definition(s):
:harsh or discordant sound :dissonance 2
:harshness in the sound of words or phrases

51) Apostrophe
Etymology:
Latin, from Greek apostrophē, literally, act of turning away, from apostrephein to turn away, from apo- + strephein to turn French & Late Latin; French, from Late Latin apostrophus, from Greek apostrophos, from apostrophos turned away, from apostrephein
Definition(s):
:the addressing of a usually absent person or a usually personified thing rhetorically Carlyle’s “O Liberty, what things are done in thy name!” is an example of apostrophe
:a mark ‘ used to indicate the omission of letters or figures, the possessive case, or the plural of letters or figures

52) Eureka
Etymology:
Greek heurēka I have found, from heuriskein to find; from the exclamation attributed to Archimedes on discovering a method for determining the purity of gold heuristic Greek
Definition(s):
used to express triumph on a discovery
:marked by usually sudden triumphant discovery a eureka moment
city & port NW California pop 26,128
:I have found it motto of California

53) Democracy
Etymology:
Middle French democratie, from Late Latin democratia, from Greek dēmokratia, from dēmos + -kratia -cracy
Definition(s):
:government by the people
:rule of the majority
:a government in which the supreme power is vested in the people and exercised by them directly or indirectly through a system of representation usually involving periodically held free elections
:a political unit that has a democratic government
:the principles and policies of the Democratic party in the United States from emancipation Republicanism to New Deal Democracy C. M. Roberts
:the common people especially when constituting the source of political authority
:the absence of hereditary or arbitrary class distinctions or privileges
:democracy in which the power is exercised directly by the people rather than through representatives
:a political movement advocating a gradual and peaceful transition from capitalism to socialism by democratic means
:a democratic welfare state that incorporates both capitalist and socialist practices
:a political philosophy advocating preservation of established institutions and traditional principles combined with political democracy and a social and economic program designed to benefit the common man

54) Analysis
Etymology:
New Latin, from Greek, from analyein to break up, from ana- + lyein to loosen lose New Latin, literally, analysis of situation Baron J.B.J. Fourier †1830 French geometrician & physicist
Definition(s):
:separation of a whole into its component parts
:the identification or separation of ingredients of a substance
:a statement of the constituents of a mixture
:proof of a mathematical proposition by assuming the result and deducing a valid statement by a series of reversible steps
:a branch of mathematics concerned mainly with limits, continuity, and infinite series
:calculus 1b
:an examination of a complex, its elements, and their relations
:a statement of such an analysis
:a method in philosophy of resolving complex expressions into simpler or more basic ones
:clarification of an expression by an elucidation of its use in discourse
:the use of function words instead of inflectional forms as a characteristic device of a language
:psychoanalysis
:analysis of variation in an experimental outcome and especially of a statistical variance in order to determine the contributions of given factors or variables to the variance
:topology 2a(1)
:neutron activation analysis
:a statistical classification technique for discovering whether the individuals of a population fall into different groups by making quantitative comparisons of multiple characteristics
:analysis of the manifest and latent content of a body of communicated material (as a book or film) through a classification, tabulation, and evaluation of its key symbols and themes in order to ascertain its meaning and probable effect
:the study of linguistic relations and structures in discourse
:the analytical process of transforming statistical data (as measurements) into linear combinations of usually independent variables
:the process of using the terms of a Fourier series to find a function that approximates periodic data
:the expression of a periodic function as a sum of sines and cosines and specifically by a Fourier series

55) Synergy
Etymology:
New Latin synergia, from Greek synergos working together
Definition(s):
:synergism
:combined action or operation
:a mutually advantageous conjunction or compatibility of distinct business participants or elements (as resources or efforts)

56) Agnostic
Etymology:
Greek agnōstos unknown, unknowable, from a- + gnōstos known, from gignōskein to know know (see agnostic)
Definition(s):
:a person who holds the view that any ultimate reality (as God) is unknown and probably unknowable
:one who is not committed to believing in either the existence or the nonexistence of God or a god
:a person who is unwilling to commit to an opinion about something political agnostics
:of, relating to, or being an agnostic (see agnostic) :involving or characterized by agnosticism
:noncommittal undogmatic

57) Topical
Etymology:

Definition(s):
:of, relating to, or arranged by topics set down in topical form
:referring to the topics of the day or place :of local or temporary interest a topical novel topical references
:designed for or involving local application and action (as on the body) a topical anesthetic a topical remedy

58) Acronym
Etymology:
acr- + -onym
Definition(s):
:a word (as NATO, radar, or laser) formed from the initial letter or letters of each of the successive parts or major parts of a compound term
:an abbreviation (as FBI) formed from initial letters :initialism

59) Spherical
Etymology:

Definition(s):
:having the form of a sphere or of one of its segments
:relating to or dealing with a sphere or its properties
:aberration that is caused by the spherical form of a lens or mirror and that gives different foci for central and marginal rays
:the angle between two intersecting arcs of great circles of a sphere measured by the plane angle formed by the tangents to the arcs at the point of intersection
:one of three coordinates that are used to locate a point in space and that comprise the radius of the sphere on which the point lies in a system of concentric spheres, the angle formed by the point, the center, and a given axis of the sphere, and the angle between the plane of the first angle and a reference plane through the given axis of the sphere
:the geometry of figures on a sphere
:a figure analogous to a plane polygon that is formed on a sphere by arcs of great circles
:a spherical polygon of three sides
:trigonometry applied to spherical triangles and polygons

60) Myriad
Etymology:
Greek myriad-, myrias, from myrioi countless, ten thousand (see myriad)
Definition(s):
:ten thousand
:a great number a myriad of ideas
:innumerable those myriad problems
:both numerous and diverse myriad topics
:having innumerable aspects or elements the myriad activity of the new land Meridel Le Sueur

61) Mystique
Etymology:
French, from mystique, adjective, mystic, from Latin mysticus
Definition(s):
:an air or attitude of mystery and reverence developing around something or someone
:the special esoteric skill essential in a calling or activity

62) Dressage
Etymology:
French, from dresser to train, drill, from Middle French
Definition(s):
:the execution by a trained horse of precision movements in response to barely perceptible signals from its rider

63) Rehearse
Etymology:
Middle English rehersen, from Anglo-French rehercer, from re- + hercer to harrow, from herce harrow hearse
Definition(s):
:to say again :repeat
:to recite aloud in a formal manner
:to present an account of :relate rehearse a familiar story
:to recount in order :enumerate rehearsed their demands
:to give a rehearsal of
:to train or make proficient by rehearsal
:to perform or practice as if in a rehearsal
:to engage in a rehearsal

64) Matinee
Etymology:
French matinée, literally, morning, from Old French, from matin morning, from Latin matutinum, from neuter of matutinus of the morning, from Matuta, goddess of morning; akin to Latin maturus ripe mature
Definition(s):
:a musical or dramatic performance or social or public event held in the daytime and especially the afternoon
:a handsome male performer

65) Entourage
Etymology:
French, from Middle French, from entourer to surround, from entour around, from en in (from Latin in) + tour circuit turn
Definition(s):
:one’s attendants or associates
:surroundings

66) Escargot
Etymology:
French, snail, from Middle French, from Old Occitan escaragol
Definition(s):
:a snail prepared for use as food

67) Doctrinaire
Etymology:
French, from doctrine
Definition(s):
:one who attempts to put into effect an abstract doctrine or theory with little or no regard for practical difficulties
:of, relating to, or characteristic of a doctrinaire :dogmatic

68) Egalitarian
Etymology:
French égalitaire, from égalité equality, from Latin aequalitat-, aequalitas, from aequalis equal
Definition(s):
:asserting, promoting, or marked by egalitarianism

69) Deluxe
Etymology:
French de luxe, literally, of luxury
Definition(s):
:notably luxurious, elegant, or expensive a deluxe edition deluxe hotels

70) Clementine
Etymology:
French clémentine probably from Clément Rodier, French priest who discovered the hybrid ca. 1902
Definition(s):
:a small nearly seedless citrus fruit that is probably a hybrid between a tangerine and an orange

71) Fusillade
Etymology:
French, from fusiller to shoot, from fusil
Definition(s):
:a number of shots fired simultaneously or in rapid succession
:something that gives the effect of a fusillade a fusillade of rocks and bottles
:a spirited outburst especially of criticism

72) Surveillance
Etymology:
French, from surveiller to watch over, from sur- + veiller to watch, from Old French veillier, from Latin vigilare, from vigil watchful vigil
Definition(s):
:close watch kept over someone or something (as by a detective)
:supervision

73) Rapport
Etymology:
French, from rapporter to bring back, refer, from Old French raporter to bring back, from re- + aporter to bring, from Latin apportare, from ad- ad- + portare to carry fare
Definition(s):
:relation
:relation marked by harmony, conformity, accord, or affinity

74) Saboteur
Etymology:
French, from saboter
Definition(s):
:one that practices sabotage

75) Rendezvous
Etymology:
Middle French, from rendez vous present yourselves (see rendezvous)
Definition(s):
:a place appointed for assembling or meeting
:a place of popular resort :haunt
:a meeting at an appointed place and time
:the process of bringing two spacecraft together
:to meet or come together at a particular time and place:come together for a rendezvous (see rendezvous)
:to bring together at a particular time and place :bring together for a rendezvous
:to meet at a rendezvous

76) Repertoire
Etymology:
French répertoire, from Late Latin repertorium (see repertory)
Definition(s):
:a list or supply of dramas, operas, pieces, or parts that a company or person is prepared to perform
:a supply of skills, devices, or expedients part of the repertoire of a quarterback
:amount supply an endless repertoire of summer clothes
:a list or supply of capabilities the instruction repertoire of a computer
:the complete list or supply of dramas, operas, or musical works available for performance our modern orchestral repertoire
:the complete list or supply of skills, devices, or ingredients used in a particular field, occupation, or practice the repertoire of literary criticism

77) Renaissance
Etymology:
French, from Middle French, rebirth, from Old French renaistre to be born again, from Latin renasci, from re- + nasci to be born nation
Definition(s):
:the transitional movement in Europe between medieval and modern times beginning in the 14th century in Italy, lasting into the 17th century, and marked by a humanistic revival of classical influence expressed in a flowering of the arts and literature and by the beginnings of modern science
:the period of the Renaissance
:the neoclassic style of architecture prevailing during the Renaissance
:a movement or period of vigorous artistic and intellectual activity
:rebirth revival
:a person who has wide interests and is expert in several areas

78) Lieutenant
Etymology:
Middle English, from Anglo-French lieu tenant, from liu + tenant holding, from tenir to hold, from Latin tenēre thin
Definition(s):
:an official empowered to act for a higher official
:an aide or representative of another in the performance of duty :assistant
:first lieutenant
:second lieutenant
:a commissioned officer in the navy or coast guard ranking above a lieutenant junior grade and below a lieutenant commander
:a fire or police department officer ranking below a captain
:a commissioned officer in the army, air force, or marine corps ranking above a major and below a colonel
:a commissioned officer in the navy or coast guard ranking above a lieutenant and below a commander
:a commissioned officer in the army, air force, or marine corps who ranks above a major general and whose insignia is three stars
:a deputy or subordinate governor: as
:an elected official serving as deputy to the governor of an American state
:the formal head of the government of a Canadian province appointed by the federal government as the representative of the crown
:a commissioned officer in the navy or coast guard ranking above an ensign and below a lieutenant
:a commissioned officer in the army, air force, or marine corps ranking above a second lieutenant and below a captain
:a naval officer responsible for a ship’s upkeep
:a commissioned officer in the British air force who ranks with a captain in the army
:a commissioned officer of the lowest rank in the army, air force, or marine corps

79) Debacle
Etymology:
French débâcle, from débâcler to clear, from Middle French desbacler, from des- de- + bacler to block, perhaps from Vulgar Latin *bacculare, from Latin baculum staff
Definition(s):
:a tumultuous breakup of ice in a river
:a violent disruption (as of an army) :rout
:a great disaster
:a complete failure :fiasco

80) Camouflage
Etymology:
French, from camoufler to disguise
Definition(s):
:the disguising especially of military equipment or installations with paint, nets, or foliage
:the disguise so applied
:concealment by means of disguise
:behavior or artifice designed to deceive or hide
:to conceal or disguise by camouflage
:to practice camouflage
:made in colors or patterns typical of camouflage a camouflage jacket

81) Ambulance
Etymology:
French, from (hôpital) ambulant, literally, ambulant field hospital, from ambulant itinerant, from Latin ambulant-, ambulans, present participle of ambulare
Definition(s):
:a vehicle equipped for transporting the injured or sick
:a lawyer or lawyer’s agent who incites accident victims to sue for damages

82) Plateau
Etymology:
French, from Middle French, platter, from plat flat
Definition(s):
:a usually extensive land area having a relatively level surface raised sharply above adjacent land on at least one side :tableland
:a similar undersea feature
:a region of little or no change in a graphic representation
:a relatively stable level, period, or condition
:a level of attainment or achievement the 500-point plateau
:to reach a level, period, or condition of stability or maximum attainment
plateau NW Arizona S of Grand Canyon
plateau SW United States W of Rocky Mountains in Colorado River basin in N Arizona, S & E Utah, W Colorado, & NW N.Mex
plateau E Washington, E Oregon, & SW Idaho in Columbia River basin
tableland E United States, part of the S Appalachian Mountains W of Tennessee River extending from S West Virginia to NE Alabama
highland 2000–5000 feet (610–1524 m) SW Texas
plateau N Arizona & SW Utah N of Grand Canyon
plateau region N Western Australia N of 19°30′S
see canadian shield

83) Physique
Etymology:
French, from physique physical, bodily, from Latin physicus of nature, from Greek physikos
Definition(s):
:the form or structure of a person’s body :bodily makeup

84) Amenable
Etymology:
Anglo-French, from amener to bring, compel, from a- (from Latin ad-) + mener to lead, from Late Latin minare to drive, from Latin minari to threaten mount
Definition(s):
:liable to be brought to account :answerable citizens amenable to the law
:capable of submission (as to judgment or test) :suited the data is amenable to analysis
:readily brought to yield, submit, or cooperate a government not amenable to change
:willing 1 was amenable to spending more time at home

85) Nougat
Etymology:
French, from Occitan, from Old Occitan nogat, from noga nut, from Vulgar Latin *nuca, from Latin nuc-, nux nut
Definition(s):
:a confection of nuts or fruit pieces in a sugar paste

86) Beige
Etymology:
French
Definition(s):
:cloth made of natural undyed wool
:a variable color averaging light grayish-yellowish brown
:a pale to grayish yellow
:of the color beige
:lacking distinction :vanilla 2

87) Vogue
Etymology:
Middle French, action of rowing, course, fashion, from voguer to sail, from Old French, from Old Italian vogare to row from Vogue, a fashion magazine French
Definition(s):
:the leading place in popularity or acceptance
:popular acceptation or favor :popularity
:a period of popularity
:one that is in fashion at a particular time
:to strike poses in campy imitation of fashion models especially as a kind of dance
:let the galley be kept rowing :keep on, whatever may happen

88) Garage
Etymology:
French, act of docking, garage, from garer to dock, from Middle French garrer, probably ultimately from Old Norse vara to beware, take care; akin to Old High German biwarōn to protect ware
Definition(s):
:a shelter or repair shop for automotive vehicles
:a cabinet with a vertical rolling door that is used for storing a small kitchen appliance
:to keep or put in a garage
:an amateur rock band typically holding its rehearsals in a garage and usually having only a local audience
:a sale of used household or personal articles (as furniture, tools, or clothing) held on the seller’s own premises

89) Flamboyant
Etymology:
French, from present participle of flamboyer to flame, from Old French, from flambe (see flamboyant)
Definition(s):
:characterized by waving curves suggesting flames flamboyant tracery flamboyant architecture
:marked by or given to strikingly elaborate or colorful display or behavior a flamboyant performer
:royal poinciana

90) Impasse
Etymology:
French, from in- + passer to pass
Definition(s):
:a predicament affording no obvious escape
:deadlock
:an impassable road or way :cul-de-sac

91) Angst
Etymology:
Dan & German; Dan, from German
Definition(s):
:a feeling of anxiety, apprehension, or insecurity teenage angst

92) Hinterland
Etymology:
German, from hinter hinder + Land
Definition(s):
:a region lying inland from a coast
:a region remote from urban areas
:a region lying beyond major metropolitan or cultural centers

93) Verboten
Etymology:
German, from Old High German farboten, past participle of farbioten to forbid (akin to Old English forbēodan to forbid), from far-, fur- for- + biotan to offer bid
Definition(s):
:forbidden
:prohibited by dictate

94) Wanderlust
Etymology:
German, from wandern to wander + Lust desire, pleasure
Definition(s):
:strong longing for or impulse toward wandering

95) Waltz
Etymology:
German Walzer, from walzen to roll, dance, from Old High German walzan to turn, roll welter
Definition(s):
:a ballroom dance in 3/4 time with strong accent on the first beat and a basic pattern of step-step-close
:music for a waltz or a concert composition in 3/4 time
:to dance a waltz
:to move or advance in a lively or conspicuous manner :flounce
:to advance easily and successfully :breeze often used with through
:to approach boldly used with up can’t just waltz up and introduce ourselves
:to dance a waltz with
:to grab and lead (as a person) unceremoniously :march

96) Bratwurst
Etymology:
German, from Old High German brātwurst, from brāt meat without waste + wurst sausage
Definition(s):
:fresh pork sausage for frying

97) Poltergeist
Etymology:
German, from poltern to knock + Geist spirit
Definition(s):
:a noisy usually mischievous ghost held to be responsible for unexplained noises (as rappings)

98) Knapsack
Etymology:
Low German knappsack or Dutch knapzak, from Low German & Dutch knappen to make a snapping noise, eat + Low German sack or Dutch zak sack
Definition(s):
:a bag (as of canvas or nylon) strapped on the back and used for carrying supplies or personal belongings

99) Realschule
Etymology:

Definition(s):

100) Pitchblende
Etymology:
part translation of German Pechblende, from Pech pitch + Blende blende
Definition(s):
:a brown to black mineral that consists of massive uraninite, has a distinctive luster, contains radium, and is the chief ore-mineral source of uranium

101) Schadenfreude
Etymology:
German, from Schaden damage + Freude joy
Definition(s):
:enjoyment obtained from the troubles of others

102) Glockenspiel
Etymology:
German, from Glocke bell + Spiel play
Definition(s):
:a percussion instrument consisting of a series of graduated metal bars tuned to the chromatic scale and played with two hammers

103) Weimaraner
Etymology:
German, from Weimar, Germany
Definition(s):
:any of a breed of large light gray usually short-haired pointers of German origin

104) Ersatz
Etymology:
German ersatz-, from Ersatz, noun, substitute
Definition(s):
:being a usually artificial and inferior substitute or imitation ersatz turf ersatz intellectuals

105) Gesundheit
Etymology:
German, literally, health, from gesund healthy (from Old High German gisunt) + -heit -hood sound
Definition(s):
used to wish good health especially to one who has just sneezed

106) Zeitgeber
Etymology:
German, from Zeit time + Geber giver
Definition(s):
:an environmental agent or event (as the occurrence of light or dark) that provides the stimulus setting or resetting a biological clock of an organism

107) Dreidel
Etymology:
Yiddish dreydl, from dreyen to turn, from Middle High German drǣjen, from Old High German drāen throw
Definition(s):
:a 4-sided toy marked with Hebrew letters and spun like a top in a game of chance
:a children’s game of chance played especially at Hanukkah with a dreidel

108) Rottweiler
Etymology:
German, from Rottweil, city in Germany
Definition(s):
:any of a breed of tall powerful black-and-tan short-haired dogs of German origin that are commonly used as guard dogs

109) Springerle
Etymology:

Definition(s):

110) Pfeffernuss
Etymology:

Definition(s):

111) Noodle
Etymology:
perhaps alteration of noddle German Nudel imitative Japanese
Definition(s):
:a stupid person :simpleton
:head noggin
:a food paste made usually with egg and shaped typically in ribbon form
:to improvise on an instrument in an informal or desultory manner
:a translucent noodle made from mung beans
:a thick Japanese noodle made from wheat flour and usually served in a soup

112) Nachtmusik
Etymology:

Definition(s):

113) Glitz
Etymology:
perhaps modification of German glitzern to glitter, from Middle High German glitzen; akin to Old Norse glitra to glitter
Definition(s):
:extravagant showiness :glitter ostentation
:to make flashy or extravagant in appearance often used with up she got glitzed up for the party

114) Zwinger
Etymology:

Definition(s):

115) Bagel
Etymology:
Yiddish beygl, from Middle High German *böugel ring, from bouc ring, from Old High German; akin to Old English bēag ring, būgan to bend bow
Definition(s):
:a firm doughnut-shaped roll traditionally made by boiling and then baking

116) Rucksack
Etymology:
German, from German dialect, from Rucken back + Sack sack
Definition(s):
:knapsack

117) Prattle
Etymology:
Low German pratelen; akin to Middle Dutch praten to prate
Definition(s):
:prate
:to utter or make meaningless sounds suggestive of the chatter of children :babble
:to say in an unaffected or childish manner
:trifling or empty talk
:a sound that is meaningless, repetitive, and suggestive of the chatter of children

118) Pumpernickel
Etymology:
German, from pumpern to break wind + Nickel goblin; from its reputed indigestibility
Definition(s):
:a dark coarse sourdough bread made of unbolted rye flour

119) Panzer
Etymology:
German Panzer tank, armor, coat of mail, from Middle High German panzier, from Old French panciere, from pance, panche belly paunch
Definition(s):
:tank 3
:a German tank of World War II
:a German armored division

120) Seltzer
Etymology:
modification of German Selterser (Wasser) water of Selters, from Nieder Selters, Germany
Definition(s):
:artificially carbonated water

121) Cockatoo
Etymology:
Dutch kaketoe, from Malay kakatua
Definition(s):
:any of various large noisy chiefly Australasian crested parrots (family Cacatuidae and especially genus Cacatua)

122) Furlough
Etymology:
Dutch verlof, literally, permission, from Middle Dutch, from ver- for- + lof permission; akin to Middle High German loube permission for-, leave
Definition(s):
:a leave of absence from duty granted especially to a soldier
:a document authorizing such a leave of absence
:to grant a furlough to
:to lay off from work

123) Buckwheat
Etymology:
Dutch boekweit, from Middle Dutch boecweit, from boec- (akin to Old High German buohha beech tree) + weit wheat beech
Definition(s):
:any of a genus (Fagopyrum of the family Polygonaceae, the buckwheat family) of Eurasian herbs with alternate leaves, clusters of apetalous pinkish-white flowers, and triangular seeds
:either of two plants (F. esculentum and F. tartaricum) cultivated for their edible seeds
:the seed of a buckwheat used as a cereal grain

124) Grabble
Etymology:
Dutch grabbelen, from Middle Dutch, frequentative of grabben
Definition(s):
:to search with the hand :grope
:to lie or fall prone :sprawl

125) Ravel
Etymology:
Dutch rafelen, from rafel loose thread
Definition(s):
:to separate or undo the texture of :unravel
:to undo the intricacies of :disentangle
:entangle confuse
:to become entangled or confused
:to become unwoven, untwisted, or unwound :fray
:break up crumble
:an act or result of raveling: as
:something tangled
:something raveled out
:a loose thread
(Joseph) Mau*rice bixche16.wavmȯ-ˈrēs 1875–1937 Fr. composer

126) Netherlander
Etymology:

Definition(s):
low countries a historical usage
country NW Europe on North Sea; a kingdom, official ✽ Amsterdam, seat of government The Hague area 16,033 square miles (41,525 square kilometers), pop 16,500,000

127) Muddle
Etymology:
probably from obsolete Dutch moddelen, from Middle Dutch, from modde mud; akin to Middle Low German mudde
Definition(s):
:to make turbid or muddy
:to befog or stupefy especially with liquor
:to mix confusedly
:to make a mess of :bungle
:to think or act in a confused aimless way
:a state of especially mental confusion
:a confused mess
:to achieve a degree of success without much planning or effort

128) Loiter
Etymology:
Middle English
Definition(s):
:to delay an activity with idle stops and pauses :dawdle
:to remain in an area for no obvious reason
:to lag behind

129) Wiseacre
Etymology:
Middle Dutch wijssegger soothsayer, modification of Old High German wīzzago; akin to Old English wītega soothsayer, witan to know
Definition(s):
:one who pretends to knowledge or cleverness
:smart aleck

130) Howitzer
Etymology:
Dutch houwitser, ultimately from Czech houfnice ballista
Definition(s):
:a short cannon used to fire projectiles at medium muzzle velocities and with relatively high trajectories

131) Voortrekker
Etymology:

Definition(s):

132) Maelstrom
Etymology:
obsolete Dutch (now maalstroom), from malen to grind + strom stream
Definition(s):
:a powerful often violent whirlpool sucking in objects within a given radius
:something resembling a maelstrom in turbulence

133) Mynheer
Etymology:
Dutch mijnheer, from mijn my + heer master, sir
Definition(s):
:a male Netherlander used as a title equivalent to Mr.

134) Galjoen
Etymology:

Definition(s):

135) Waterzooi
Etymology:
Dutch dialect, from water water + zooi quantity of cooked food
Definition(s):
:a stew of fish or chicken and vegetables in a seasoned stock thickened with cream and egg yolks

136) Flense
Etymology:
Dutch flensen or Dan & Norwegian flense Middle French flenchir to bend, of Germanic origin; akin to Middle High German lenken to bend, Old High German hlanca flank lank
Definition(s):
:to strip (as a whale) of blubber or skin
:to withdraw or shrink from or as if from pain :wince
:to tense the muscles involuntarily in anticipation of discomfort

137) Hartebeest
Etymology:
obsolete Afrikaans (now hartbees), from Dutch, from hart deer + beest beast
Definition(s):
:either of two large African antelopes (Alcelaphus buselaphus and Sigmoceros lichtensteinii) with long faces and short annulate divergent horns
:a smaller antelope (Damaliscus hunteri) of eastern Africa having a horizontal white line between the eyes

138) Roodebok
Etymology:

Definition(s):

139) Wainscot
Etymology:
Middle English, from Middle Dutch wagenschot, probably from wagen wagon + schot shot, crossbar
Definition(s):
:a fine grade of oak imported for woodwork
:a usually paneled wooden lining of an interior wall
:a lining of an interior wall irrespective of material
:the lower three or four feet (about one meter) of an interior wall when finished differently from the remainder of the wall
:to line with or as if with boards or paneling

140) Apartheid
Etymology:
Afrikaans, from apart apart + -heid -hood
Definition(s):
:racial segregation
:a former policy of segregation and political and economic discrimination against non-European groups in the Republic of South Africa
:separation segregation cultural apartheid gender apartheid

141) Clapboard
Etymology:
part translation of Dutch klaphout stave wood
Definition(s):
:a size of board for making staves and wainscoting
:a narrow board usually thicker at one edge than the other used for siding
:a pair of hinged boards one of which has a slate with data identifying a piece of film and which are banged together in front of a motion-picture camera at the start of a take to facilitate editing called also clapper board

142) Daffodil
Etymology:
perhaps from Dutch de affodil the asphodel
Definition(s):
:any of various perennial bulbous herbs (genus Narcissus) of the amaryllis family
:one whose flowers have a large corona elongated into a trumpet compare jonquil narcissus

143) Waywiser
Etymology:

Definition(s):

144) Buckwagon
Etymology:

Definition(s):

145) Potash
Etymology:
singular of pot ashes
Definition(s):
:potassium carbonate especially from wood ashes
:potassium or a potassium compound especially as used in agriculture or industry
:potassium hydroxide

146) Wintergreen
Etymology:

Definition(s):
:any of a genus (Pyrola of the family Pyrolaceae, the wintergreen family) of evergreen perennial herbs (as the shinleafs) that have basal leaves and racemose flowers
:any of a genus (Gaultheria) of evergreen plants of the heath family
:a low creeping evergreen shrub (G. procumbens) of North America with white flowers and spicy red berries compare checkerberry
:an essential oil from this plant
:the flavor of this oil wintergreen lozenges
:the methyl ester of salicylic acid that is used as a flavoring and as a counterirritant

147) Huckster
Etymology:
Middle English hukster, from Middle Dutch hokester, from hoeken to peddle
Definition(s):
:hawker peddler
:one who produces promotional material for commercial clients especially for radio or television
:haggle
:to deal in or bargain over
:to promote aggressively

148) Guilder
Etymology:
Middle English gylder, gyldren, modification of Middle Dutch gulden
Definition(s):
:gulden

149) Trigger
Etymology:
alteration of earlier tricker, from Dutch trekker, from Middle Dutch trecker one that pulls, from trecken to pull trek Middle English, trusty, nimble, of Scandinavian origin; akin to Old Norse tryggr faithful; akin to Old English trēowe faithful true Middle English, from Old English pullian; akin to Middle Low German pulen to shell, cull
Definition(s):
:a piece (as a lever) connected with a catch or detent as a means of releasing it
:the part of the action moved by the finger to fire a gun
:a similar movable part by which a mechanism is actuated trigger of a spray gun
:something that acts like a mechanical trigger in initiating a process or reaction
:to release or activate by means of a trigger
:to fire by pulling a mechanical trigger trigger a rifle
:to cause the explosion of trigger a missile with a proximity fuse
:to initiate, actuate, or set off by a trigger an indiscreet remark that triggered a fight a stimulus that triggered a reflex
:to release a mechanical trigger
:stylishly or jauntily trim everything was trim and trig and bright Mark Twain
:extremely precise :prim
:firm vigorous
:irresponsible in the use of firearms
:inclined to shoot before clearly identifying the target
:inclined to be irresponsible in matters that might precipitate war
:aggressively belligerent in attitude
:a localized usually tender or painful area of the body and especially of a muscle that when stimulated gives rise to pain elsewhere in the body
:a gun trigger so adjusted as to permit the firearm to be fired by a very slight pressure
:immediately responsive to the slightest stimulus a hair–trigger temper
:delicately adjusted or easily disrupted
:to exert force upon so as to cause or tend to cause motion toward the force
:to stretch (cooling candy) repeatedly pull taffy
:to strain abnormally pull a tendon
:to hold back (a racehorse) from winning
:to work (an oar) by drawing back strongly
:to draw out from the skin pull feathers from a rooster’s tail
:to pluck from a plant or by the roots pull flowers pull turnips
:extract pull a tooth
:to hit (a ball) toward the left from a right-handed swing or toward the right from a left-handed swing compare push
:to draw apart :rend tear
:to print (as a proof) by impression
:to remove from a place or situation pull the engine pulled the pitcher in the third inning pulled the show
:to bring (a weapon) into the open pulled a knife
:perform carry out pull an all-nighter pull guard duty
:commit perpetrate pull a robbery pull a prank
:put on assume pull a grin
:to act or behave in the manner of pulled a Horace Greely and went west Steve Rushin
:to draw the support or attention of :attract pull votes often used with in
:obtain secure pulled a B in the course
:to demand or obtain an advantage over someone by the assertion of pull rank
:to use force in drawing, dragging, or tugging
:to move especially through the exercise of mechanical energy the car pulled clear of the rut
:to take a drink
:to draw hard in smoking pulled at a pipe
:to strain against the bit
:to draw a gun
:to admit of being pulled
:to feel or express strong sympathy :root pulling for my team to win
:to move back from the line of scrimmage and toward one flank to provide blocking for a ballcarrier
:to make a face :grimace
:to perpetrate a trick or fraud
:to refrain from using all the force at one’s disposal
:to regain one’s composure
:to deceive someone playfully :hoax
:to do one’s full share of the work
:to move out :leave
:to exert hidden influence or control
:to disconnect a medical life-support system
:to withdraw essential and especially financial support
:to weaken or unsettle especially by removing support or assistance from
:to throw a changeup
:to make a decisive move or action
:to blind to the true situation :hoodwink
:to work in harmony :cooperate

150) Scrabble
Etymology:
Dutch schrabbelen to scratch
Definition(s):
:scrawl scribble
:to scratch, claw, or grope about clumsily or frantically
:scramble clamber
:to struggle by or as if by scraping or scratching scrabble for survival
:scramble
:scribble
:scramble
:scribble
:a repeated scratching or clawing

151) Quell
Etymology:
Middle English, to kill, quell, from Old English cwellan to kill; akin to Old High German quellen to torture, kill, quāla torment, Lithuanian gelti to hurt Middle English, from quellen to kill
Definition(s):
:to thoroughly overwhelm and reduce to submission or passivity quell a riot
:quiet pacify quell fears
:slaughter
:the power of quelling

152) Nestle
Etymology:
Middle English, from Old English nestlian, from nest
Definition(s):
:nest 1
:to settle snugly or comfortably
:to lie in an inconspicuous or sheltered manner
:to settle, shelter, or house in or as if in a nest the children were nestled all snug in their beds Clement Moore
:to press closely and affectionately nestles a kitten in her arms

153) Cleanser
Etymology:

Definition(s):
:one that cleanses
:a preparation (as a scouring powder or a skin cream) used for cleaning

154) Farthing
Etymology:
Middle English ferthing, from Old English fēorthung (akin to Middle High German vierdunc fourth part), from Old English fēortha fourth
Definition(s):
:a former British monetary unit equal to 1/4 of a penny
:a coin representing this unit
:something of small value :mite

155) Mattock
Etymology:
Middle English mattok, from Old English mattuc
Definition(s):
:a digging and grubbing tool with features of an adze and an ax or pick

156) Behoove
Etymology:
Middle English behoven, from Old English behōfian, from behōf
Definition(s):
:to be necessary, proper, or advantageous for it behooves us to go
:to be necessary, fit, or proper

157) Hustings
Etymology:
Middle English, from Old English hūsting, from Old Norse hūsthing, from hūs house + thing assembly
Definition(s):
:a local court formerly held in various English municipalities and still held infrequently in London
:a local court in some cities in Virginia
:a raised platform used until 1872 for the nomination of candidates for the British Parliament and for election speeches
:an election platform :stump
:the proceedings or locale of an election campaign

158) Hassock
Etymology:
Middle English, sedge, from Old English hassuc
Definition(s):
:tussock
:a cushion for kneeling a church hassock
:a padded cushion or low stool that serves as a seat or leg rest

159) Earthenware
Etymology:

Definition(s):

160) Nosiest
Etymology:

Definition(s):

161) Newfangled
Etymology:
Middle English, from newefangel, from new + Old English *-fangol, from fōn (past participle fangen) to take, seize pact
Definition(s):
:attracted to novelty
:of the newest style or kind had many newfangled gadgets in the kitchen

162) Folksiness
Etymology:

Definition(s):
:sociable friendly
:informal, casual, or familiar in manner or style folksy humor

163) Yieldable
Etymology:

Definition(s):

164) Paddock
Etymology:
alteration of Middle English parrok, from Old English pearroc, from Medieval Latin parricus
Definition(s):
:a usually enclosed area used especially for pasturing or exercising animals
:an enclosure where racehorses are saddled and paraded before a race
:an often enclosed field
:an area at an automobile racecourse where racing cars are parked

165) Whirlpool
Etymology:

Definition(s):
:a confused tumult and bustle :whirl
:a magnetic or impelling force by which something may be engulfed refusing to be drawn into this whirlpool of intrigue A. D. White
:water moving rapidly in a circle so as to produce a depression in the center into which floating objects may be drawn :eddy vortex
:whirlpool bath
:a therapeutic bath in which all or part of the body is exposed to forceful whirling currents of hot water

166) Dross
Etymology:
Middle English dros, from Old English drōs dregs
Definition(s):
:the scum that forms on the surface of molten metal
:waste or foreign matter :impurity
:something that is base, trivial, or inferior

167) Threshold
Etymology:
Middle English thresshold, from Old English threscwald; akin to Old Norse threskjǫldr threshold, Old English threscan to thresh
Definition(s):
:the plank, stone, or piece of timber that lies under a door :sill
:gate door
:end boundary
:the end of a runway
:the place or point of entering or beginning :outset on the threshold of a new age
:the point at which a physiological or psychological effect begins to be produced has a high threshold for pain
:a level, point, or value above which something is true or will take place and below which it is not or will not

168) Hawthorn
Etymology:
Middle English hawethorn, from Old English hagathorn, from haga hawthorn + thorn hedge
Definition(s):
:any of a genus (Crataegus) of spring-flowering spiny shrubs or small trees of the rose family with glossy and often lobed leaves, white or pink fragrant flowers, and small red fruits

169) Fathom
Etymology:
Middle English fadme, from Old English fæthm outstretched arms, length of the outstretched arms; akin to Old Norse fathmr fathom, Latin patēre to be open, pandere to spread out, Greek petannynai
Definition(s):
:a unit of length equal to six feet (1.83 meters) used especially for measuring the depth of water sometimes used in the singular when qualified by a number five fathom deep
:comprehension
:probe
:to take soundings
:to measure by a sounding line
:to penetrate and come to understand couldn’t fathom the problem

170) Orchard
Etymology:
Middle English, from Old English ortgeard, from ort- (from Latin hortus garden) + geard yard yard
Definition(s):
:a planting of fruit trees, nut trees, or sugar maples
:the trees of such a planting
:a widely grown tall stout hay and pasture grass (Dactylis glomerata) of Eurasia that grows in tufts and has loose open panicles called also cocksfoot
:sugar bush

171) Bequeath
Etymology:
Middle English bequethen, from Old English becwethan, from be- + cwethan to say quoth
Definition(s):
:to give or leave by will used especially of personal property
:to hand down :transmit

172) Worrisome
Etymology:

Definition(s):
:causing distress or worry worrisome news
:inclined to worry or fret investors feeling worrisome

173) Nightingale
Etymology:
Middle English, alteration of Old English nihtegale, from niht + galan to sing yell
Definition(s):
:an Old World thrush (Luscinia megarhynchos syn. Erithacus megarhynchos) noted for the sweet usually nocturnal song of the male
:any of various other birds noted for their sweet song or for singing at night
Florence 1820–1910 Eng. nurse & philanthropist

174) Mermaid
Etymology:
Middle English mermayde, from mere sea (from Old English) + mayde maid marine
Definition(s):
:a fabled marine creature with the head and upper body of a woman and the tail of a fish

175) Dealership
Etymology:

Definition(s):
:an authorized sales agency an automobile dealership

176) Errand
Etymology:
Middle English erend message, business, from Old English ǣrend; akin to Old High German ārunti message
Definition(s):
:an oral message entrusted to a person
:embassy mission
:a short trip taken to attend to some business often for another was on an errand for his mother
:the object or purpose of such a trip

177) Workmanship
Etymology:

Definition(s):
:something effected, made, or produced :work
:the art or skill of a workman
:the quality imparted to a thing in the process of making a vase of exquisite workmanship

178) Manhandle
Etymology:

Definition(s):
:to handle roughly
:to move or manage by human force manhandled the posts into place

179) Roughhewn
Etymology:

Definition(s):
:to hew (as timber) coarsely without smoothing or finishing
:to form crudely
:being in a rough, unsmoothed, or unfinished state :crudely formed rough–hewn beams
:lacking refinement he was rather attractive, in a rough–hewn kind of way Jan Speas

180) Kipper
Etymology:
Middle English kypre, from Old English cypera; akin to Old English coper copper
Definition(s):
:a male salmon or sea trout during or after the spawning season
:a kippered herring or salmon
:to cure (split dressed fish) by salting and smoking

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